Monday, February 1, 2016

A Documentary Weekend

Over the weekend I binged on Netflix while trying to get over this awful cold.  The first was "Unbranded" and the second was "Hot Girls Wanted".  Both were informative and a little bit heartbreaking.

The documentary "Unbranded" is based on four young men from Texas who adopt wild mustangs from the BLM, break them, train them and ride them from the Mexican border in Arizona to the Canadian border in Montana.  It showed the trails, heartbreaks and true test of friendships.  The film was poignant and although it has underlying support for the BLM, I highly recommend it.

I am not sure how many people are really aware of what is occurring with the wild mustangs, but the biggest problem is the removal of public lands to private ownership and lease.  The BLM claims the wild mustang population is close to double the allotted population based on the acreage available.  It becomes an issue because farmers are "leasing" these lands for grazing of their cattle.  Think of the crazy Oregon standoff that happened last month.  I fully understand that cattle need to graze and I fully support the protection of the wild mustang and all wild life, the problem I have is the BLM.  In my opinion they are just another way for the government to funnel money away from where to country really needs it.

The second documentary was "Hot Girls Wanted".  It followed the lives of 8 amateur porn stars around the age of 18, who were given a one way ticket to Miami where they get sucked into the online world of porn.  It was amazing to me how these girls will do anything to escape what they consider to be awful lives and just want to make it big.  One of the boyfriends of one of the girls compared her to a legal prostitute and I have to admit I could see where he was coming from.

The most disgusting part about it, is the fact that  porn has moved out of California because state law now requires all actors to use protection, Miami and Florida as a whole don't.  These girls are out having sex with lord knows who without protection and without birth control because, and I quote from the film, "I can always buy Plan B."  It is heartbreaking to know these are young women who lack the confidence and self assurance found this to be their only answer.  In the film it is addressed that these girls only get booked for about 3 to maybe 6 months if they are lucky.  What happens to them afterward is anyone's guess.

Two totally different movies, both enlightening in different ways.